Feature

Ramesh’s world of paper

By K. Rajshree

The word ‘paper craft’ is always associated with Origami- a Japanese paper art. Many people are not aware of the concept – ‘Kirigami’ a variation of origami that involves cutting folded pieces of paper to make intricate designs.

Kirigami is similar to origami but the major difference is that in origami, you fold paper whereas in Kirigami, you fold and cut paper.

J.Ramesh also known as Kagitha sirpi is a pioneer of Kirigami artwork in India and a well known paper sculptor. This 40 year old OMR resident has been practicing Kirigami for more than 20 years. He gave up his job as a mason to pursue this paper craft.

“From young age, I was always fascinated with paper crafts. I began practicing this unique work of art by merely folding and cutting sheets of paper in different angles using scissors, out of my own imagination and creativity without using any pencil. I initially did it out of my own genuine interest and innate passion and did not know this was Kirigami until a Netherland tourist told me when he saw my work at an exhibition,” says Ramesh.

Over the years, he has participated in several art exhibitions and conducted many training sessions. He displayed his works and conducted a demonstration cum training programme at the 60th anniversary of Indo Japan Diplomatic Relationship organised by the Consulate General of Japan, ABK-AOTS DOSOKAI, Tamil Nadu Centre, in March 2012.

“I developed interest in 3D Kirigami when I did a replica of Chennai Central Station. Then I went on to create replicas of various landmarks. It usually takes more than 8 hours to create a replica of a building. So far, I have created more than 7000 paper designs including building structures. Despite creating various designs, I do not have the necessary financial backing to frame and store my works,” adds Ramesh.

He is also teaching the art to various school and college students through various training sessions and has received appreciations and certificates from various organisations including Tamil Nadu Eyal Isai Nataka Mandram and Central Footwear Training Institute.

“The specialty of Kirigami is that it is really an amalgam of many other art forms and is virtually an integration of many artistic types, including sculpting, collage, illustration, and the likes. It enhances our creativity and concentration. My main aim is to make this art prominent among other art forms,” adds Ramesh.

He is conducting Kirigami classes for children and adults. Ramesh can be reached at 98412 40152, or email to kagithasirpiindia @gmail.com.